Uninspiring Posters

As an amusing antidote to the sickly sweet inspirational type posters that seem so ubiquitous London based letterer, Linzie Hunter, has created this poster set that celebrates the mundane.

Linzie’s lettering featured on this blog a year ago. Take a look at her playful lettering here

Coming soon…
I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myself, Erik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.
readlagom:
Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter. High-res

Coming soon…

I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myselfErik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.

readlagom:

Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

Creative Covers

This Frankenstein, book cover is right up my street and quite inspirational for the work I’m doing at the moment. It’s was design a few years ago by Maciej Ratajki, a designer based in Warsaw, Poland.

For me, everything works well together. The composition with triple use of the ‘n’,  the play of scale with the author’s name and the ‘i’ nested within the large characters, and the blackletter typeface.
My only reservation is the detailed loop on the ‘a’ which is a little distracting when combined with the scale of smaller type. I’d have been tempted to redraw the top of it.

Spotted over on http://typeverything.com/

Bike Badges

Collecting these would be a great hobby for someone interested in both type and bikes.

Self proclaimed ‘bike geek’ Jeffery Conner is certainly into the latter. A professor from Michigan, USA, Jeff’s been collecting bicycle head badges since 2000, starting with just three badges, his collection grew to over 800 in just 36 months. The slightly curved badges come from all over the world and Jeff has found almost every letter of the alphabet (he was just missing Q & X according to this article

“There are symbols of freedom and speed – with wings and birds abounding – and also a debt to heraldic animals (serpents, lions and eagles, in particular), with ideas of strength and precision also conveyed in the designs.”

Last year London design agency, Carter Wong, produced a book collecting some of their favourite badges as a self-initiated project.

Imaging one of these flying in front of your trusty wheels!

Autumnal Paris

I like the style of this illustrated type, by student, Tim Paza May, in Brazil. Although the theme is Paris, I’m picking up some Arts and Crafts influences in the style (the pinwheels, patterns and colours).

Created as part of a vector illustration course where students were asked to pick a word and work around its theme. Quite appropriate colours as Europe moves into September and summer begins to end.

Via betype:

Vector Paris by Tim Paza May

London Loop
I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)
The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.
What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.
High-res

London Loop

I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)

The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.

What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.

(via herbertfrost)

Psst…calligraphy class notes

To prepare for a move from London to Sydney, I’m going through my plan chest and book shelves, full typographic and lettering ephemera, and decide what stays and what comes with me (mostly with me it seems!). So you might an eclectic mix of photos over the coming days.

For those of you that were interested in Seb Lester’s recent guest post on calligraphy, I thought these might be useful. I was given these worksheets during the Calligraphy workshop with Andreas Frohloff, during Type London (Places 2011). I posted a couple of photos at the time of his class and wonderful antique pen collection, here & here.

The sheet is quite handy for referring to how the shapes of latin letters are constructed. They are of course in German, so if anyone fancies translating in the comments, go for it!

I never did get to finish this screen print. Now it’s packing-up time as I prepare to move to Sydney for a while. High-res

I never did get to finish this screen print. Now it’s packing-up time as I prepare to move to Sydney for a while.

Creepy Type 2

This ‘oral alphabet’ must surely be a counterpart to the fleshy type I posted about a few months ago.

The toothy type has been created by Japanese designer Takayuki Ogawa who was inspired by the the mouth’s ability to express such a wide range of emotions by itself. This is clearly demonstrated in the many emoticons that use the mouth to describe the key emotion—  :) :D :p. :/ —etc.

Brilliantly executed, they have been made from stone powder clay, acrylic paint, varnish, wood and iron, though, you might think twice before using them on that wedding invite…