Easter Type Combo

I just spotted these ultra vivid posters featuring the innovative typefaces of MuirMcNeil. They are offering a free font with each poster, but you’ve on a few hours left—the offer ends on Tuesday 22 April, 8am (GMT+1).

This London based studio was formed in 2010 by accomplished typographic designers, Paul McNeil and Hamish Muir to explore and develop parametric design systems.

Cloths of Heaven, new print from Seb Lester.

British designer and 8 Faces interviewee, Seb Lester, released a new limited edition print today. ‘Cloths of Heaven’, based on the poem ‘Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven’ by W B Yeats, is available both as a print and embroidered artwork.
“Yeats’s poem references ‘embroidered cloths’ and ‘gold and silver threads’, so I wanted to try to make the screen print look like an exquisite and timelessly beautiful piece of highly ornamental needlework. I’ve drawn from Medieval, Renaissance and 18th-century sources but I have also tried to integrate personal, progressive and irreverent flourishing ideas. The result is a hybrid stylistic treatment that I think could only exist in the 21st century.”
See more on I Love Typography
The R that didn’t make it.
I’ve been working on a lettering and typography project following on from my Exmouth Print. One the drop caps or illustrated initials that I need to illustrate is an fun ‘R’. I took inspiration loosely from the lettering on the iconic ‘Golden Gallopers’ carousel on Brighton Pier. While the gorgeous hand-painted lettering on the ride has a jaunty, seaside feel, I needed something a bit more ‘typographic’ but keeping that flamboyant style. Unfortunately the one above isn’t going to work in the overall design but I thought you might like to see it. High-res

The R that didn’t make it.

I’ve been working on a lettering and typography project following on from my Exmouth Print. One the drop caps or illustrated initials that I need to illustrate is an fun ‘R’. I took inspiration loosely from the lettering on the iconic Golden Gallopers carousel on Brighton Pier. While the gorgeous hand-painted lettering on the ride has a jaunty, seaside feel, I needed something a bit more ‘typographic’ but keeping that flamboyant style. Unfortunately the one above isn’t going to work in the overall design but I thought you might like to see it.

You are the one

I really like the combined lettering on these Brazilian ads for Feevale University. It’s a shame the final, compiled design is cluttered with extra messaging and branding—which could have been contained within the numeral—but the actual lettering works well with the photography.

typostrate: “You are not another one, you are the one”. Made by Mauricio Thomsen, Art Director from Porto Alegre, Brazil. A perfect example how typography can function within big campaigns and ad commercials. 

The Proper Art of Writing (1655)

I stumbled upon these calligraphy examples on The Public Domain Review. They are taken from a 17th Century German book. Some of the characters are so highly decorated they aren’t even recognisable anymore. 

The volume’s full title is as extravagant as the examples it shows:  The Proper Art of Writing: a compilation of all sorts of capital or initial letters of German, Latin and Italian fonts from different masters of the noble art of writing. See more here

wOW! Illuminations
The design of this type specification has hugely inspired me over the last few years. The black and fluorescent decorations on the initials feel embossed with an almost flock texture. I love the positive/negative capitals and look at the way the pattern surrounding the O opens to allow the T close. It manages to look both antique and modern.
Unfortunately this rather blurry photo is all I have. In the past I took a more lackadaisical approach to note taking, and have no record of the specimen’s title. I was shown the book by the previous librarian of St. Brides. On a recent return trip I tried to find the book but with the largest collection of specimens in the world, and a change in librarians, the search was futile. High-res

wOW! Illuminations

The design of this type specification has hugely inspired me over the last few years. The black and fluorescent decorations on the initials feel embossed with an almost flock texture. I love the positive/negative capitals and look at the way the pattern surrounding the O opens to allow the T close. It manages to look both antique and modern.

Unfortunately this rather blurry photo is all I have. In the past I took a more lackadaisical approach to note taking, and have no record of the specimen’s title. I was shown the book by the previous librarian of St. Brides. On a recent return trip I tried to find the book but with the largest collection of specimens in the world, and a change in librarians, the search was futile.

Typo Tomorrow

Typo San francisco starts tomorrow (10-11th April). Numerous names from the type world will be speaking including our own Elliot Jay Stocks. He’ll be joined by; Dan Rhatigan of Monotype, Gemma O’Brien from Sydney and Sibylle Hagmann. The facilitators include Erik Spiekermann, and Stephen Coles.

This year’s theme, “Rhythm,” explores the cadence of the creative process, the underlying tempo of inspiration, and the beats of the design experience. - See more.

Here Be Monsters

I noticed this wonderful Icelandic project of illustrated type inspired by medieval maps featuring fantastical sea creatures. 

Design by Reykjavík based Stella Björg, these decorated capitals remind me of the Victorian illustrations I’ve written about recently. I love that several of the creatures appear to be based on specific Icelandic mythical beasts, as named at the bottom of the print. I also really like the print colours and flecked paper that gives the final work its antique look.

My “Here Be Monsters” illustrated letters started from the simple idea of writing “MONSTER” but having finished it just didn’t seem like there was much left to complete the alphabet. I was in no hurry to complete it, so very slowly monstrous letters got added and finally there appeared a complete alphabet. - Stella Björg

Daft Type

These Daft Punk merchandise ads do a great job of mimicking ads from the ’70s. The layouts, colours and type all evoke the decades’ graphic style.

Above, you can see one of their latest ads alongside a Coke ad from 1970. (The very same ad that Michael Bierut describes in the Helvetica film: “It’s the real thing. Period! Coke. Period! In Helvetica. Period! Any questions? Of course not. Drink Coke. Period! Simple.”)

The typeface chosen for the 2014 ad appears to be Kabel Black or Geometric 231 Heavy and while it’s no Helvetica, I think it does a much better job in this instance.