Autumnal Paris

I like the style of this illustrated type, by student, Tim Paza May, in Brazil. Although the theme is Paris, I’m picking up some Arts and Crafts influences in the style (the pinwheels, patterns and colours).

Created as part of a vector illustration course where students were asked to pick a word and work around its theme. Quite appropriate colours as Europe moves into September and summer begins to end.

Via betype:

Vector Paris by Tim Paza May

London Loop
I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)
The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.
What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.
High-res

London Loop

I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)

The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.

What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.

(via herbertfrost)

Psst…calligraphy class notes

To prepare for a move from London to Sydney, I’m going through my plan chest and book shelves, full typographic and lettering ephemera, and decide what stays and what comes with me (mostly with me it seems!). So you might an eclectic mix of photos over the coming days.

For those of you that were interested in Seb Lester’s recent guest post on calligraphy, I thought these might be useful. I was given these worksheets during the Calligraphy workshop with Andreas Frohloff, during Type London (Places 2011). I posted a couple of photos at the time of his class and wonderful antique pen collection, here & here.

The sheet is quite handy for referring to how the shapes of latin letters are constructed. They are of course in German, so if anyone fancies translating in the comments, go for it!

I never did get to finish this screen print. Now it’s packing-up time as I prepare to move to Sydney for a while. High-res

I never did get to finish this screen print. Now it’s packing-up time as I prepare to move to Sydney for a while.

Creepy Type 2

This ‘oral alphabet’ must surely be a counterpart to the fleshy type I posted about a few months ago.

The toothy type has been created by Japanese designer Takayuki Ogawa who was inspired by the the mouth’s ability to express such a wide range of emotions by itself. This is clearly demonstrated in the many emoticons that use the mouth to describe the key emotion—  :) :D :p. :/ —etc.

Brilliantly executed, they have been made from stone powder clay, acrylic paint, varnish, wood and iron, though, you might think twice before using them on that wedding invite…

Comic Sans For Cancer

Earlier this week I went along to the opening of the Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition inspired by the 20th anniversary of type designer, Vincent Connare’s clownish typeface.

Around 200 designs from 34 countries were invited to illustrate what the typeface means to them. Posters, featuring the typeface ‘everybody loves to hate’, were are being sold to raise money for Cancer Research UK.

Due to the character of the typeface combined with of the subject matter, the excellent collection of designs lean toward the quirky and amusing. London based, Vincent Connare was at the event and giving it his full support, signing books and copies of the poster that that he’d submitted (featuring his normally placid cat, above).

Comic Sans for Cancer. Until 24th August 2014, The Proud Archivist London

Doorway to type nirvana?
I love this close up of a mural by Colossal Media, in Williamsburg, New York. The sign painters are well-known for their enormous outdoor murals, art projects and advertising images. Always hand-painted and often hundreds of feet off of the ground.
This is photo is from their Big Brush Project, a public art initiative showcasing their work. It was produced in collaboration with NYC-based lettering artist Greg Lamarche and reads Sky High Murals.

“Greg’s technique of hand-cutting found letters was a perfect compliment to the precision-based, hand-paint production method. This piece speaks greatly to the evolution of this community, the art world, and the hand-paint story.”
High-res

Doorway to type nirvana?

I love this close up of a mural by Colossal Media, in Williamsburg, New York. The sign painters are well-known for their enormous outdoor murals, art projects and advertising images. Always hand-painted and often hundreds of feet off of the ground.

This is photo is from their Big Brush Project, a public art initiative showcasing their work. It was produced in collaboration with NYC-based lettering artist Greg Lamarche and reads Sky High Murals.

“Greg’s technique of hand-cutting found letters was a perfect compliment to the precision-based, hand-paint production method. This piece speaks greatly to the evolution of this community, the art world, and the hand-paint story.”

It’s surprising and a little exciting when you flick through Tumblr and see something you’ve designed. This recent musical  ‘G’ was inspired by the Pouchée types. It needs a little more work and is part of a bigger design which I’m hoping to finish and then letterpress later this month. More to follow.

visualvibs:

Musical ‘G’ by Jamie Clarke
Twitter: @visualvibs High-res

It’s surprising and a little exciting when you flick through Tumblr and see something you’ve designed. This recent musical ‘G’ was inspired by the Pouchée types. It needs a little more work and is part of a bigger design which I’m hoping to finish and then letterpress later this month. More to follow.

visualvibs:

Musical ‘G’ by Jamie Clarke

Twitter: @visualvibs

(via goodtypography)

Choices

Here in our fourth celebratory guest post, Brand and lettering designer Andrei Robu reveals his philosophy for high quality work.

I’ve realised I’ve been searching for a new place to call home.

I’ve just realised that we’ve been in and out of South East Asia for the past two years. Together with my girlfriend, we’ve spent three months in Indonesia, two in the Philippines, eight months in Bangkok. I’m writing this from Berlin and next week I’ll be in Vienna. All of this while freelancing, and all because we were searching for something.

It all started out as an excuse to relax. I needed some time off after getting out of a partnership in a design studio - managing people is damn exhausting. Time away made me realise how important the simple things are, having your coffee at your favourite coffee shop in the morning, enjoying the sun at lunch, meeting friends in the park in the afternoon, living in a big apartment in a nice and safe city… they are all priceless and wouldn’t be possible without my work. I get to draw for a living.

I stare at the strokes, move the beziers, redraw until it feels right, and I get at peace while doing it.

I drew letters all my life but while travelling I first discovered the pleasure of drawing a typeface. Type design for me is balance. I do it without pursuing perfection in any of its forms. I just do it because I love it. It’s a bit like meditation: I stare at the strokes, move the beziers, redraw until it feels right, and I get at peace while doing it. I know many like-minded people who love the sound of the pencil touching the paper; discovering a nice ligature by accident. It’s pure pleasure; it’s passion, and you feel there’s this certain elegance of the craft.

After working for so many years I’ve realised that I need plenty of time and space to be able to create the best work for my clients. Going to an office can be fun but not being able to choose the projects you take on is bad for you and your client.

My next step is to find the place where I get to choose my opportunities. I want to do the best work I can and I need balance in my life to do it. That means having time and freedom for thinking and perfecting my craft.