Type Worship

Sep 29

[video]

Sep 26

[video]

Sep 25

Composition for the Times
This typographic layout in honour of Stanley Morrison really caught my attention. A clever composition by Pedro Arbeláez in Columbia which harnesses scale and contrast to devastating effect. Look at that ‘A’ continuing the angled stroke of the ‘R’.
I’m compiled some other typographic layout examples on Pinterest and more will  follow here with an upcoming interview with Pentagram’s Jessica Svendsen.

Composition for the Times

This typographic layout in honour of Stanley Morrison really caught my attention. A clever composition by Pedro Arbeláez in Columbia which harnesses scale and contrast to devastating effect. Look at that ‘A’ continuing the angled stroke of the ‘R’.

I’m compiled some other typographic layout examples on Pinterest and more will  follow here with an upcoming interview with Pentagram’s Jessica Svendsen.

Sep 24

Alphabet post by Dribbble

Today Dribbble got in touch with me to say that they had posted one of my shots along with a number of other Type and Lettering examples. They’ve collected together this beautifully presented sample of designs below, I feel lucky to be included.
Type:
imageAnders by Tom Anders

imageRidewell by Kostas Bartsokas


imageGood News Sans by Kyle Wayne Benson


image In-progress typeface by Jamie Clarke (That’s me!)


imageUni Sans by Fontfabric


imageNITRO by Hoefler & Co.


imageBrix Sans by Hannes von Döhren & Livius F. Dietzel/HVD Fonts


imageArkiv by Timo Kuilder


imageMulti Headline Black Italic by Laura Meseguer


imageRetiro by Jean François Porchez (Typofonderie)


imageCompanion League by Gumpita Rahayu


imageShelley by DJ Sherman


imageAmsterdam Superstar by David A. Slaager (Fonts of Chaos)


imageAmpleSoft by Aakash Soneri


imageVoltage by Laura Worthington


Lettering:


imageLet It Roll by Jillian Adel


imageTypeLimited 001, part of Joseph Alessio's TypeLimited project


imageThe Brush Letter by Ken Barber


imageJust Have Fun! by Scott Biersack


imageCaptain Josh Hill by Claire Coullon


imageSomeThing unused by JC Deserve


imageHumble Pie Type by Danielle Evans


image 
Will Letter For Lunch by Lauren Hom


imagePractice Makes Perfect by Becca Clason


imageKingdom by David Grimes


imageWonderful Rejects by Melissa Ginsiorsky


imagebuncha hand drawn words by Lauri Johnston


imageSmooth by Jessica Libby


imagefull by Frances MacLeod


image Guilty Pleasures by Anna Ropalo


imageWednesday by Stephanie Schlim


imageSalvage Press printer’s mark by Signal Type Foundry


imageRegular Display weights finished by Neil Summerour


imageHandlettered Logotypes 3 by Mateusz Witczak


Coaches’ Picks


imageChalk Lettering by Valentina Badeanu

(Source: dribbble)

Sep 19

[video]

Sep 15

Masterfully constructed type bike by Pentagram’s Paula Scher.

Via: design-is-fine:

Paula Scher, poster PUBLIC, 2012. USA. Via Cooper Hewitt

Masterfully constructed type bike by Pentagram’s Paula Scher.

Via: design-is-fine:

Paula Scher, poster PUBLIC, 2012. USA. Via Cooper Hewitt

Sep 10

[video]

Sep 09

Coming soon…
I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myself, Erik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.
readlagom:
Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

Coming soon…

I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myselfErik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.

readlagom:

Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

Sep 08

[video]

Sep 05

[video]

Sep 03

[video]

Sep 01

[video]