Type Worship

Sep 19

[video]

Sep 15

Masterfully constructed type bike by Pentagram’s Paula Scher.

Via: design-is-fine:

Paula Scher, poster PUBLIC, 2012. USA. Via Cooper Hewitt

Masterfully constructed type bike by Pentagram’s Paula Scher.

Via: design-is-fine:

Paula Scher, poster PUBLIC, 2012. USA. Via Cooper Hewitt

Sep 10

[video]

Sep 09

Coming soon…
I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myself, Erik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.
readlagom:
Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

Coming soon…

I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myselfErik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.

readlagom:

Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

Sep 08

[video]

Sep 05

[video]

Sep 03

[video]

Sep 01

[video]

Aug 29

London Loop
I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)
The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.
What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.

London Loop

I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)

The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.

What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.

(via herbertfrost)

Aug 28

[video]

Aug 27

I never did get to finish this screen print. Now it’s packing-up time as I prepare to move to Sydney for a while.

I never did get to finish this screen print. Now it’s packing-up time as I prepare to move to Sydney for a while.

Aug 26

[video]