Something Wonderful in the post

Martina Flor, based in Berlin, is embarking on a charming side project to design and send around 100 lettered postcards to people she likes, loves, knows or wants to get in touch with around the world. Each will be entirely made, written and sent by her over a period of time.

Her dedicated blog, Letter Collections, documents the postcard design and receiver. I’ve picked a few of my favourites above. I’ll keep you posted if I’m lucky enough to receive one!

You maybe remember Martina’s work as part of last year’s Lettering vs. Calligraphy project and exhibition. You can see more of Martina’s work on her Tumblr.

Posters at Reading

Following on from the Type Design course (TDi) course I attended at Reading University last year, I’ve returned to learn more about type design and the industry. If you like to know more about the intensive summer course take a look at my daily diary from last year.

Meanwhile here are some of the cool posters I’ve spotted around the faculty. Top by Jamie Wieck, bottom right, specimen of MATD 2013 graduates.

The nail in the ampersand

How’s this for an opulent piece of typographic art. I’ll admit that I can’t quite decipher the meaning of it, the semiotics are a little over my head. Any suggestions?


New York’s political magazine The New Republic approached me to design a trademark ampersand for them. I accepted and created this mighty marble-and-gold rendition of a snake nailed to a sinking skull, coiling into the “Amperxandt” form. A lot of symbolism going on here.
High-res

The nail in the ampersand

How’s this for an opulent piece of typographic art. I’ll admit that I can’t quite decipher the meaning of it, the semiotics are a little over my head.
Any suggestions?

New York’s political magazine The New Republic approached me to design a trademark ampersand for them. I accepted and created this mighty marble-and-gold rendition of a snake nailed to a sinking skull, coiling into the “Amperxandt” form. A lot of symbolism going on here.

via londondesignz:

More from No Straight Lines.

Following my recent post showcasing the ‘No Straight Lines’ exhibit that formed part of the Alchemy Festival, here’s a few more examples that were on display. This time the glyphs derive from the Roman character set, but the forms are more delicate and exhibit organic elements. Quite a contrast to the Geometric San Serif qualities of the letters based on a hybrid of the Sinhala and Tamil writing systems.

There’s more detail on the work in general at dropr.com/aodgraphicdesign, while a summary of No Straight Lines can be found on the South Bank Centre’s website.

36 days of type

I noticed this open project over on Instagram recently, organised by Alejandro López Becerro. There’s a huge variety of characters to look through including just these 3D designs by Alejandro himself. 

While the main letters were going up in April/May the project still seems quite active. Search on Instagram #36daysOfType and #36days_<glyph name>.

Lace Lettering Magazine Cover
You may have seen a few past posts about the lettering stitchwork of the twin designers Maricor &amp; Maricar. Here is one of their recent projects. I can’t think of a more perfect evolution of the textile twins’ work.

We embroidered lettering for the cover of French magazine Paulette and their Romantique issue. The mood board we were given was lace, white and Virgin Suicides. It was tricky knowing the type would appear against a very light airy image and the first time we&#8217;ve had to composite our embroidery onto a photographic image but it turned out well I think.

via type-lover High-res

Lace Lettering Magazine Cover

You may have seen a few past posts about the lettering stitchwork of the twin designers Maricor & Maricar. Here is one of their recent projects. I can’t think of a more perfect evolution of the textile twins’ work.

We embroidered lettering for the cover of French magazine Paulette and their Romantique issue. The mood board we were given was lace, white and Virgin Suicides. It was tricky knowing the type would appear against a very light airy image and the first time we’ve had to composite our embroidery onto a photographic image but it turned out well I think.

via type-lover

Wales Millenium Centre

Type and architecture make a great match but even more so when the type is elevated to be the main feature.

Last week I was at the Millennium Centre in Cardiff, Wales. This huge arts building celebrates its 10th birthday this year and was designed by architect Jonathan Adams to express “Welshness” and be instantly recognisable. The main frontage is clad in steel coated in copper oxide.

Inspired by Roman classical architecture, two ‘monumental’ poetic lines are emblazoned above the main entrance, formed from large windows which are illuminated at night.

The passages, by Welsh poet Gwyneth Lewis, read in Welsh: “Creu Gwir fel gwydr o ffwrnais awen”, which means “Creating truth like glass from the furnace of inspiration.” The English is “In These Stones Horizons Sing”.

Spot the beautifully formed Ff ligature.

Additional Photo credits:

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard

OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.

This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

London Transport Type

Last week I had the chance to visit the London Transport Museum in the old Flower Market building in Covent Garden Piazza.

I’d been meaning to go for a while, particularly after the 100th anniversary of Johnston’s pervading typeface last year, and to see the history of the iconic roundel logotype which first appeared in 1908.

With a rich visual heritage spanning 200 years there’s plenty of graphic design and typography to see. There’s a decent sized display dedicated to graphic design and signage of the transport system with lots of printed ephemera. However type and lettering examples cover everything: vintage buses, underground carriages, posters, wayfinding.

Above, you can see some print examples together with hand–painted signage, ceramics, metalwork, and even some beautiful Pouchée type in use.