Design

Showing 168 posts tagged Design

A for Art

A logo for the Philadelphia Museum of Art has has been designed by Pentagram’s Paula Scher.

Aiming to put ‘art’ front and centre, it features a flexible initial A that can customised to show off the museum’s collection of 227,000 items. The Museum’s typeface Avenir is customized for the new configuration.

The identity overhaul coincides with the unveiling of plans for a renewal and expansion of the Museum by architect Frank Gehry.

Something Wonderful in the post

Martina Flor, based in Berlin, is embarking on a charming side project to design and send around 100 lettered postcards to people she likes, loves, knows or wants to get in touch with around the world. Each will be entirely made, written and sent by her over a period of time.

Her dedicated blog, Letter Collections, documents the postcard design and receiver. I’ve picked a few of my favourites above. I’ll keep you posted if I’m lucky enough to receive one!

You maybe remember Martina’s work as part of last year’s Lettering vs. Calligraphy project and exhibition. You can see more of Martina’s work on her Tumblr.

via londondesignz:

More from No Straight Lines.

Following my recent post showcasing the ‘No Straight Lines’ exhibit that formed part of the Alchemy Festival, here’s a few more examples that were on display. This time the glyphs derive from the Roman character set, but the forms are more delicate and exhibit organic elements. Quite a contrast to the Geometric San Serif qualities of the letters based on a hybrid of the Sinhala and Tamil writing systems.

There’s more detail on the work in general at dropr.com/aodgraphicdesign, while a summary of No Straight Lines can be found on the South Bank Centre’s website.

Lace Lettering Magazine Cover
You may have seen a few past posts about the lettering stitchwork of the twin designers Maricor & Maricar. Here is one of their recent projects. I can’t think of a more perfect evolution of the textile twins’ work.

We embroidered lettering for the cover of French magazine Paulette and their Romantique issue. The mood board we were given was lace, white and Virgin Suicides. It was tricky knowing the type would appear against a very light airy image and the first time we’ve had to composite our embroidery onto a photographic image but it turned out well I think.

via type-lover High-res

Lace Lettering Magazine Cover

You may have seen a few past posts about the lettering stitchwork of the twin designers Maricor & Maricar. Here is one of their recent projects. I can’t think of a more perfect evolution of the textile twins’ work.

We embroidered lettering for the cover of French magazine Paulette and their Romantique issue. The mood board we were given was lace, white and Virgin Suicides. It was tricky knowing the type would appear against a very light airy image and the first time we’ve had to composite our embroidery onto a photographic image but it turned out well I think.

via type-lover

Covered in characters

Above are a few of the typographically led book cover designs from the David Pearson exhibition, currently on in London.  

I love the ‘redacted’ George Orwell, 1984, cover with it’s debossed title under black ink. I was also quite taken with the chilling cover for Cormac McCarthy’s The Road.

There’s a week left to go, so if you find yourself in Shoreditch, London before the 28th June, drop in.

David Pearson is an acclaimed British designer, famed for his beautiful series of Penguin book cover designs.

David studied at Central St Martins in London (1999–2002) before taking a job at Penguin Books as text designer and later, cover designer. He left to establish his own studio – Type as Image – in 2007.

David played a key role in the recent re-emergence of Penguin Books through projects such as the multi-million selling Great Ideas series, Penguin by Design and thePopular Classics series. He has won numerous awards for book design, has been listed as one of Britain’s Top 50 Designers by the Guardian and nominated for the Design Museum’s Designer of the Year Award.

Hebrew Club Typography

I was keen to show this impressive typographic work by 3rd year visual communication students at Shenkar College of Engineering and Design.

As part of a “Type as Image” course, the brief was to create three design formats for past Israeli music venues: an A0 poster, 4 A2 posters and 16 flyers.

With no illustration allowed, the students were pushed to create innovative layout and typographic systems that interpret a wide range of musical genres.

I’m unable to read Hebrew but Senior Lecturer, Nadav Barkan, was kind enough to steer me through some of the great work.

Above work (from top):

Itay WeinstockAriel MedinaTal ManiDenis Kushnir

Making the invisible visible, with ink and type

After documenting its progress on Twitter for over a month, Laura Hudson’s inky typographic project reached its zenith this weekend. As part of her final degree project, Laura has created a time-lapse film of ink being absorbed into a lettered design to reveal a message about the invisible nature of mental illness.

As a sufferer of depression Laura wanted to highlight a cause she felt passionate and aligned her project with the Time to Change mental health campaign. “The idea is as the ink absorbs it’s physically making the fact visible, raising awareness.”

Inspired by Oscar Diaz’s Ink calendar, she contacted him to ask about paper typed used, but after a slightly cagey response she decided to test out different types of paper herself, finally settling on 300gsm scientific grade blotting paper.

Her lettered design was then laser cut into the paper and suspended in her studio. The ends of the paper structure rested in vials of cyan printer ink and the natural capillary action of the paper drew the pigment up the lettering. The process produced some lovely chromatic bleed effects (as shown).

Laura took time-lapse photos to record the process. In tests the ink moved 15cm in five minutes over a straight line but at the scale of the final design it slowed dramatically after six days, requiring only one photograph every 12 hours to measure its progress. Other challenges also cropped up on the way: “Unfortunately I’ll be pressing the camera shutter for my project. Time lapse is broken so now I’m babysitting!”

After a little ‘encouragement’ with warm water the ink was finally absorbed into the whole piece and the film was completed. Take a look here.

Type Patterns

I really like these simple typographic “Patterns by Molly”. Molly Kennedy-Darling is a designer from Portland, Oregon, who is challenging herself to design a new pattern each week, setting a new theme each month. With the bold colours and jolly letter styles, they’d make great wrapping paper for designer gifts.

Globe Jotter

These wonderful hand-painted globes are by Laura Maxcy, of Mississippi. Each vintage globe is drawn on directly using paint pens and then sprayed with a protective coating. 

As someone who’s not a fan of the pastiche quote posters that seem so ubiquitous, I love the connection between the sayings, the lettering and the globes. It’s this combination that gives the otherwise trite captions a twist of wit and whim.

“Although I got my degree in graphic design, I needed a creative outlet that didn’t involve staring at a computer screen all day. I started hand-lettering quotes on vintage landscape prints I found at a thrift store, with which I planned to decorate a room in my house. Instead I decided to list them on Etsy, along with my painted globes. Each of my items are definitely unique and one-of-a-kind.”