Jamie Clarke

Showing 33 posts tagged Jamie Clarke

Coming soon…
I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myself, Erik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.
readlagom:
Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter. High-res

Coming soon…

I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myselfErik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.

readlagom:

Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

8Faces Type Worship: Top Posts
Since launching, back in 2011, we’ve interviewed designers, reviewed books and hand-picked hundreds of inspiring type and lettering projects to feature on Type Worship. Here, we’ve chosen some of the most popular entries—together with a few of our favourites—just in case you missed them. 
Typographer’s Top Typefaces
Each issue of 8 Faces magazine asks 8 world-renowned designers to choose their 8 top typefaces. From the 336 chosen so far, here’s the top picks.

 
John Pouchée alphabets
Described as the most ambitious and most beautiful types created in wood in any period. Used with permission and thanks to the St Bride Foundation and I.M. Imprimit.  See them here.

 
Layered Type
A look at the growing popularity typefaces plus Terrance Weinzierl, type designer at Monotype, takes us through the creation of his award-winning layered, custom font. See it here.

 
We are all a part of the same thing
By Dominique Falla. The tactile typographer’s most famous piece, that spawned several copycats. See the original post here. Also see my interview with Dominique from 2012.

 
Math Type
Experimental type plotted from millions of lines. See more.

 
3D Car Park Signage
Innovative, one-point-perspective, signage for a Melbourne car park. See more.

 
Lumen Type
Ethereal letters created with water droplets and light. See more.

 
Upstanding Lettering
A look at Yulia Brodskaya’s beautiful paper lettering or ‘quilling’ work. See more.

 
Type Design at Reading University (TDi Short course)
A day-by-day summary of the intensive (and fantastically enjoyable) two week summer course learning all about Latin and non-Latin type design. See more.

 
How to design your own typeface
This beginners’ guide, written from a beginner’s perspective, introduces some of the tips and techniques taught on the University of Reading’s condensed Type Design course (TDi). Further information on Type Worship & the full article over on Creative Blog

 
The Geometry of Type: Book Review
A concise review of Stephen Coles’ examination of key typefaces . Read it here.

 
ROID
One of the most influential graffiti artists from the UK and a glimpse at his move from walls to canvas. See more.

 
Shadow type
Incredible lettering formed with light and wire. See more.

 
Exmouth Market Print
A surprise recent entry. The typographic time capsule, letterpress print, proved a hit on the blog and was picked up by a variety of other design journals. Take a look at it here.

 
Summer Reading (Type design book list)
A short list of suggested typography and type design books from the University of Reading’s Type Design course with additions from other type designers in the field. See more.
High-res

8Faces Type Worship: Top Posts

Since launching, back in 2011, we’ve interviewed designers, reviewed books and hand-picked hundreds of inspiring type and lettering projects to feature on Type Worship. Here, we’ve chosen some of the most popular entries—together with a few of our favourites—just in case you missed them. 

Typographer’s Top Typefaces

Each issue of 8 Faces magazine asks 8 world-renowned designers to choose their 8 top typefaces. From the 336 chosen so far, here’s the top picks.

Typographer's Top Typefaces

 

John Pouchée alphabets

Described as the most ambitious and most beautiful types created in wood in any period. Used with permission and thanks to the St Bride Foundation and I.M. Imprimit. See them here.

Typographer's Top Typefaces

 

Layered Type

A look at the growing popularity typefaces plus Terrance Weinzierl, type designer at Monotype, takes us through the creation of his award-winning layered, custom font. See it here.

Layered Type

 

We are all a part of the same thing

By Dominique Falla. The tactile typographer’s most famous piece, that spawned several copycats. See the original post here. Also see my interview with Dominique from 2012.

We are all a part of the same thing

 

Math Type

Experimental type plotted from millions of lines. See more.

Math Type

 

3D Car Park Signage

Innovative, one-point-perspective, signage for a Melbourne car park. See more.

3D Car Park Signage

 

Lumen Type

Ethereal letters created with water droplets and light. See more.

Lumen Type

 

Upstanding Lettering

A look at Yulia Brodskaya’s beautiful paper lettering or ‘quilling’ work. See more.

Upstanding Lettering

 

Type Design at Reading University (TDi Short course)

A day-by-day summary of the intensive (and fantastically enjoyable) two week summer course learning all about Latin and non-Latin type design. See more.

Type Design at Reading University

 

How to design your own typeface

This beginners guide, written from a beginner’s perspective, introduces some of the tips and techniques taught on the University of Reading’s condensed Type Design course (TDi). Further information on Type Worship & the full article over on Creative Blog

How to design your own typeface

 

The Geometry of Type: Book Review

A concise review of Stephen Coles’ examination of key typefaces . Read it here.

The Geometry of Type: Book Review

 

ROID

One of the most influential graffiti artists from the UK and a glimpse at his move from walls to canvas. See more.

ROID

 

Shadow type

Incredible lettering formed with light and wire. See more.

Shadow type

 

Exmouth Market Print

A surprise recent entry. The typographic time capsule, letterpress print, proved a hit on the blog and was picked up by a variety of other design journals. Take a look at it here.

Exmouth Market Print

 

Summer Reading (Type design book list)

A short list of suggested typography and type design books from the University of Reading’s Type Design course with additions from other type designers in the field. See more.

Summer Reading

Typographic time capsule

Here is a sneak-peek of a typographic print I’ve been working on. It’s a snapshot of Exmouth Market, a vibrant commercial street, full of independent shops, restaurants and cafés, close to me in Central London. The aim is to capture its colourful history and present day character for posterity.

Historical research was conducted over a couple of months, to uncover the location’s 400-year-old story that includes; vineyards, duck hunting, a Victorian tea garden and an atrocious graveyard now buried under the adjacent park. The print also lists over 40 of the street’s venues, in an ‘establishments of note’ section, that includes the weekly market stalls that set-up along the street.

To evoke the feel of the market, each of the illuminated capitals, spelling ‘Exmouth’, has been inspired by the rich assortment of lettering found on the street, or its story. The typography has been arranged to create a formal structure that includes the use of ornaments, pilcrows and other interesting characters.

A limited edition is being letterpressed next week in silver, turquoise and black on 300gsm Crane’s Lettra paper. I’m looking forward to seeing how it turns out.

Thank you
Today, Type Worship reached a surprising milestone. The blog has gained 100,000 followers on Tumblr.
It’s a surprise because although the subject of typography (& lettering) has been growing in popularity it is; let’s face it, a geeky obsession that can kill a pleasant conversation with the force of a parking ticket typed in Comic Sans.
Still, the rise in appreciation of typography and lettering continues (Read Gerry Leonidas’s thoughts on it’s future). Identifying a single cause of this is difficult but the combination of influencing factors must surely include; the growth of personal publishing, the maturity of web design, the renaissance of letterpress, films like Helvetica the movie and books like Just My Type. Universities are also emphasising typography skills within their graphic design courses, which feeds the cycle with more knowledgeable students. (I’d love to hear other views on this, in the comments). Either way, this can only be a good thing.
It’s also been almost exactly a year since Type Worship partnered with Elliot Jay Stocks’ fantastic 8 Faces magazine which I’d admired since issue #1. After a few chance meetings and a couple of excited phone calls we made it official. I hope you’ll agree that this has helped broaden the blog’s content with exclusives and more involvement from designers and illustrators in the field. There’s plenty more to come so stay tuned!
A very big thank you to everyone that has read, liked, re-blogged, tweeted, reviewed, contacted Type Worship and to Tumblr for their continued support.
Jamie Clarke
Above artwork by recent contributor Mary Kate McDevitt High-res

Thank you

Today, Type Worship reached a surprising milestone. The blog has gained 100,000 followers on Tumblr.

It’s a surprise because although the subject of typography (& lettering) has been growing in popularity it is; let’s face it, a geeky obsession that can kill a pleasant conversation with the force of a parking ticket typed in Comic Sans.

Still, the rise in appreciation of typography and lettering continues (Read Gerry Leonidas’s thoughts on it’s future). Identifying a single cause of this is difficult but the combination of influencing factors must surely include; the growth of personal publishing, the maturity of web design, the renaissance of letterpress, films like Helvetica the movie and books like Just My Type. Universities are also emphasising typography skills within their graphic design courses, which feeds the cycle with more knowledgeable students. (I’d love to hear other views on this, in the comments). Either way, this can only be a good thing.

It’s also been almost exactly a year since Type Worship partnered with Elliot Jay Stocks’ fantastic 8 Faces magazine which I’d admired since issue #1. After a few chance meetings and a couple of excited phone calls we made it official. I hope you’ll agree that this has helped broaden the blog’s content with exclusives and more involvement from designers and illustrators in the field. There’s plenty more to come so stay tuned!

A very big thank you to everyone that has read, liked, re-blogged, tweeted, reviewed, contacted Type Worship and to Tumblr for their continued support.

Jamie Clarke

Above artwork by recent contributor Mary Kate McDevitt

I Love Clerkenwell
Today is the start of Clerkenwell Design Week, named after the thriving creative district close to the centre of London. Its the UK’s leading independent design festival and features over 60 showrooms displaying work and will host presentations, workshops and product launches across a broad range of design disciplines.
Clerkenwell is also the historical home of London’s type foundries. At its height, all of the world’s major typefounders had a presence here, packed into this small vibrant area, close to the royal courts. There was even a road called ‘Type Street’, close to Caslon’s foundry and I recently discovered that there were two foundries on my street alone.In a return to form, the district has recently seen Monotype open a satallite studio here, together with Fontsmith who named a popular typeface after the small enclave.
Clerkenwell is also home to many of London’s design agencies, furniture stores and boasts more architects per square mile than anywhere else on the planet.
Above is one of my favourite designs: a typographic map of Clerkenwell. “Broadside 5” is a letterpress print by letterpress master and typographerAlan Kitching. This map now serves as an historical reminder of the changes in the area, since its printing in 1992. Exmouth Market, to the north, of the is now a buzzing strip of restaurants and independent shop and no longer home to “Oysters, Crabs and Lobsters” nor “Bric-a-brac”. There is however still a Pie & Mash shop and tattoo artist maintaining the East-end feel. There’s nowhere else in London I’d rather be. High-res

I Love Clerkenwell

Today is the start of Clerkenwell Design Week, named after the thriving creative district close to the centre of London. Its the UK’s leading independent design festival and features over 60 showrooms displaying work and will host presentations, workshops and product launches across a broad range of design disciplines.

Clerkenwell is also the historical home of London’s type foundries. At its height, all of the world’s major typefounders had a presence here, packed into this small vibrant area, close to the royal courts. There was even a road called ‘Type Street’, close to Caslon’s foundry and I recently discovered that there were two foundries on my street alone.
In a return to form, the district has recently seen Monotype open a satallite studio here, together with Fontsmith who named a popular typeface after the small enclave.

Clerkenwell is also home to many of London’s design agencies, furniture stores and boasts more architects per square mile than anywhere else on the planet.

Above is one of my favourite designs: a typographic map of Clerkenwell. “Broadside 5” is a letterpress print by letterpress master and typographerAlan Kitching. This map now serves as an historical reminder of the changes in the area, since its printing in 1992. Exmouth Market, to the north, of the is now a buzzing strip of restaurants and independent shop and no longer home to “Oysters, Crabs and Lobsters” nor “Bric-a-brac”. There is however still a Pie & Mash shop and tattoo artist maintaining the East-end feel.
There’s nowhere else in London I’d rather be.

8 Faces Issue #6 is now available to buy.

Our latest issue features stunning de-bossed cover art by Stefan Weyer (tilt it towards the light to see the artwork in full) and interviews with Simon Walker, Dan Rhatigan, Seb Lester, Nina Stössinger, Grant Hutchinson, Mike Kus, and Eric Olson and Nicole Dotin of Process Type. In addition to that stellar line-up, we have essays from Christopher Murphy, Leo Koppelkamm, and Typekit’s Tim Brown, and an introduction by Craig Mod.

Only 2000 copies are available! Order yours now at 8Faces.com

What is 8 Faces?

If you could use just eight typefaces, which would you choose? 8 Faces is a magazine that asks this question — and many more — to eight leading designers from the fields of print, web, illustration, and of course type design itself. Eighty-eight pages of in-depth interviews, critical essays, and inspiration from the very best in the business. We pride ourselves on producing a printed magazine that you’ll want to keep on your bookshelf. Our covers are adorned with our foil-blocked silver logo and each issue is an experiment with an attention-grabbing new printing technique.

8 Faces typography magazine is out tomorrow.

Here are some more peeks of issue #6, literally hot of the press.

We’ve got some fine specimens for you — of both the typographic and human varieties! We interviewed Dan Rhatigan, Type Director at Monotype, and artist Seb Lester. We spoke to Simon Walker about designing our latest artwork print, Nina Stössinger about FF Ernestine, Grant Hutchinson about his journey through the type industry, Mike Kus about print-informed web design, and one of my all-time favourite foundries: the wonderful Process Type.

Sketchy Characters

I spent an enjoyable day yesterday re-learning how to screen print at London’s ‘Print Club’.

As a test print I decided to use some of my sketchbook letters and experiment with a few types of paper, including this lovely gold and silver.

The one-day course was very good, running through everything; preparing your artwork, making your positives, coating your screen, printing your work and finally removing your stencil. Well recommended!

8 Faces #6 is coming…

 If you could only use eight typefaces for the rest of your life, which would you choose? 

8 Faces Magazine poses this question (and many others) to eight leading designers from the fields of web design, print design, illustration, and of course type design itself.

If you’ve been waiting patiently for the next issue, you’ll be excited to know it goes to print next week and will be ready by the end of April.  

Eighty-eight pages of in-depth interviews, critical essays, and inspiration from the very best in the business.

Printed on heavy stock with a foil-blocked cover, each issue is a true collector’s item and 8 Faces will be more at home on your bookshelf than in your magazine rack.  Who said print is dead?

About: Jamie Clarke, Type Worship Editor
I’m a London based designer and have spent many years designing high-profile websites and online campaigns. I co-founded a top design agency which was acquired in 2013. I was previously Head of Design at Microsoft in the UK.
My passion for all forms of typography and lettering led me to create this blog in 2011. I’m currently developing my own lettering projects, consisting of typographic posters and custom lettering artworks, printed by hand.
I have written for a number of publications including 8 Faces Magazine, which also sponsors the Type Worship blog. Some articles include:
How to design your own typeface
11 killer tips for a successful Tumblr blog
Clerkenwell and the Type industry
Last night a typeface saved my life (forthcoming)
Twitter, Dribble, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Behance High-res

About: Jamie Clarke, Type Worship Editor

I’m a London based designer and have spent many years designing high-profile websites and online campaigns. I co-founded a top design agency which was acquired in 2013. I was previously Head of Design at Microsoft in the UK.

My passion for all forms of typography and lettering led me to create this blog in 2011. I’m currently developing my own lettering projects, consisting of typographic posters and custom lettering artworks, printed by hand.

I have written for a number of publications including 8 Faces Magazine, which also sponsors the Type Worship blog. Some articles include:

TwitterDribbleInstagramLinkedInPinterestBehance