Type

Showing 451 posts tagged Type

London Loop
I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)
The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.
What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.
High-res

London Loop

I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)

The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.

What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.

(via herbertfrost)

Psst…calligraphy class notes

To prepare for a move from London to Sydney, I’m going through my plan chest and book shelves, full typographic and lettering ephemera, and decide what stays and what comes with me (mostly with me it seems!). So you might an eclectic mix of photos over the coming days.

For those of you that were interested in Seb Lester’s recent guest post on calligraphy, I thought these might be useful. I was given these worksheets during the Calligraphy workshop with Andreas Frohloff, during Type London (Places 2011). I posted a couple of photos at the time of his class and wonderful antique pen collection, here & here.

The sheet is quite handy for referring to how the shapes of latin letters are constructed. They are of course in German, so if anyone fancies translating in the comments, go for it!

It’s surprising and a little exciting when you flick through Tumblr and see something you’ve designed. This recent musical  ‘G’ was inspired by the Pouchée types. It needs a little more work and is part of a bigger design which I’m hoping to finish and then letterpress later this month. More to follow.

visualvibs:

Musical ‘G’ by Jamie Clarke
Twitter: @visualvibs High-res

It’s surprising and a little exciting when you flick through Tumblr and see something you’ve designed. This recent musical ‘G’ was inspired by the Pouchée types. It needs a little more work and is part of a bigger design which I’m hoping to finish and then letterpress later this month. More to follow.

visualvibs:

Musical ‘G’ by Jamie Clarke

Twitter: @visualvibs

(via goodtypography)

A for Art

A logo for the Philadelphia Museum of Art has has been designed by Pentagram’s Paula Scher.

Aiming to put ‘art’ front and centre, it features a flexible initial A that can customised to show off the museum’s collection of 227,000 items. The Museum’s typeface Avenir is customized for the new configuration.

The identity overhaul coincides with the unveiling of plans for a renewal and expansion of the Museum by architect Frank Gehry.

Embrace the wobble

In this, the second of our guest posts, Ged Palmer, designer, letterer and burgeoning sign painter, reminds us of how wide the pool of inspirational lettering is… 

Good typography is all about clean lines, smooth curves and harmony, right? Well, for the most part I subscribe to that philosophy whole-heartedly. I mean you only have to see Herman Zapf drawing curves to agree with that! Then again, these days I find myself more and more attracted to the weird and wonderful world of vernacular typography and lettering. I’m talking about the type of design that’s not made by designers: wonky signs, yard sale posters, janky tags and sketchy handwriting. Things that are made by hand are imperfect and that human quality is what gives it life, as Margaret Kilgallen once eloquently put.

So whilst we strive to make our work as beautiful and well polished as we can, let’s take a moment to embrace the wobbles, the drips, the busted-up, the forgotten and the downtrodden. 

via londondesignz:

More from No Straight Lines.

Following my recent post showcasing the ‘No Straight Lines’ exhibit that formed part of the Alchemy Festival, here’s a few more examples that were on display. This time the glyphs derive from the Roman character set, but the forms are more delicate and exhibit organic elements. Quite a contrast to the Geometric San Serif qualities of the letters based on a hybrid of the Sinhala and Tamil writing systems.

There’s more detail on the work in general at dropr.com/aodgraphicdesign, while a summary of No Straight Lines can be found on the South Bank Centre’s website.

36 days of type

I noticed this open project over on Instagram recently, organised by Alejandro López Becerro. There’s a huge variety of characters to look through including just these 3D designs by Alejandro himself. 

While the main letters were going up in April/May the project still seems quite active. Search on Instagram #36daysOfType and #36days_<glyph name>.

Typeframe: Render vs. Cardboard

OK, now I give up. After seeing so many extraordinary, life-like 3D type models I had assumed this beautifully complex ‘a’ was of the same mould. But no. This character has actually been constructed physically. It’s made me realise that the line between 3D rendered graphic shapes and real constructed shapes is now imperceptible.

This Bodoni ‘a’ is part of a personal project called Typeframe by Gerard Miró of Lo Siento a Design Studio based in Barcelona, Spain. The ‘internal structure’ of the character has been constructed from cardboard “undressing the letter to show its skeleton”. 

London Transport Type

Last week I had the chance to visit the London Transport Museum in the old Flower Market building in Covent Garden Piazza.

I’d been meaning to go for a while, particularly after the 100th anniversary of Johnston’s pervading typeface last year, and to see the history of the iconic roundel logotype which first appeared in 1908.

With a rich visual heritage spanning 200 years there’s plenty of graphic design and typography to see. There’s a decent sized display dedicated to graphic design and signage of the transport system with lots of printed ephemera. However type and lettering examples cover everything: vintage buses, underground carriages, posters, wayfinding.

Above, you can see some print examples together with hand–painted signage, ceramics, metalwork, and even some beautiful Pouchée type in use.