Typography

Showing 432 posts tagged Typography

Textured Type

I can’t believe that a year has shot past since I met up with Bobby Evans to talk about his highly recognisable poster work and how his much imitated vintage style developed. This week sees the launch of his studio’s reincarnation as Telegramme Paper Co. which maintains its emphasis on screen printed designs and gig posters but has now expanded to include home wares, custom wedding invites and hand-painted signs.

Kate Brighouse has joined Telegramme and the pair’s shared passion for vintage and mid-Century illustration style looks to be very complimentary.

The new designs continue their masterful use of retro colour palettes and ‘off-register’, textured illustration style. I’m of course drawn to the more typographic designs. I think the blend of customised typefaces, textures and imaginative themes still set the bar for this type of Illustration work. 

“With a joint love of fine paper goods and the lost joy of sending and receiving post, Bobby & Kate run the Award Winning Telegramme Paper Co. from their studio in North London.”

Jessica Svendsen Interview

I was recently poring over some of the typographic posters for the Yale School of Architecture, a series that Michael Bierut has been designing since 1998. On some of the recent designs I noticed another name appearing in the credits: Jessica Svendsen. Looking further I saw the work on Jessica’s site… and wow! I got in touch and to find out more.

What did you do leading up to working at Pentagram?

Before joining Pentagram, I spent eight years studying and working at Yale University. I first received a BA in English Literature and then a MFA in Graphic Design from the Yale School of Art. Within a week after commencement, I moved to New York and started working for Michael Bierut.

How long have you been there and what have been the highlights so far?

I have been a designer at Pentagram for a year and a half. Since I first arrived, I have been fortunate to design the Yale School of Architecture posters with Michael. As a student, I admired and avidly collected the poster series—I managed to collect over forty posters during my tenure there—so I am still dumbfounded and thrilled that I now design the series.

Is there a usual process you follow when starting a new design project?

My process is content-driven, so I eagerly respond to projects where I can geekily engage with the content. For these projects, design is interpretive. It is analyzing the content, distilling an idea or concept, and then making it visual. While I gravitate toward projects that are deeply referential, that are embedded with layers of meaning, I ultimately become preoccupied with the affective qualities of the visual form or typography. 

In terms of format, I am drawn to projects that function at a display scale (from a poster to a physical installation) and that play with sequence (from a film to a website).

What is like working with Michael Bierut at Pentagram?

Michael is one of the best bosses in the profession, and he is the real reason why I am working at Pentagram. He is a master at crafting persuasive strategy, sequencing a narrative arch, and communicating ideas. Given his encyclopaedic knowledge, it is remarkable to watch him empathize with any given project or client. 

Michael also generously trusts each of the designers on his team. Typically, each designer is independently responsible for their own client list, which means one designer may oversee an entire project from conceptualization to execution. Consequently, the design process is exceptionally efficient and each designer has a deep ownership of the work. The structure allows us to each engage with different types of clients, and to navigate and adapt the design across a wide range of formats. 

What does the future hold for you?

Purely virtual work. Designing a physical space. Directing a film. 

Image credits: Jessica Svendsen, Michael Bierut and Pentagram.

Composition for the Times
This typographic layout in honour of Stanley Morrison really caught my attention. A clever composition by Pedro Arbeláez in Columbia which harnesses scale and contrast to devastating effect. Look at that ‘A’ continuing the angled stroke of the ‘R’.
I’m compiled some other typographic layout examples on Pinterest and more will  follow here with an upcoming interview with Pentagram’s Jessica Svendsen. High-res

Composition for the Times

This typographic layout in honour of Stanley Morrison really caught my attention. A clever composition by Pedro Arbeláez in Columbia which harnesses scale and contrast to devastating effect. Look at that ‘A’ continuing the angled stroke of the ‘R’.

I’m compiled some other typographic layout examples on Pinterest and more will  follow here with an upcoming interview with Pentagram’s Jessica Svendsen.

Alphabet post by Dribbble

Today Dribbble got in touch with me to say that they had posted one of my shots along with a number of other Type and Lettering examples. They’ve collected together this beautifully presented sample of designs below, I feel lucky to be included.
Type:
imageAnders by Tom Anders

imageRidewell by Kostas Bartsokas


imageGood News Sans by Kyle Wayne Benson


image In-progress typeface by Jamie Clarke (That’s me!)


imageUni Sans by Fontfabric


imageNITRO by Hoefler & Co.


imageBrix Sans by Hannes von Döhren & Livius F. Dietzel/HVD Fonts


imageArkiv by Timo Kuilder


imageMulti Headline Black Italic by Laura Meseguer


imageRetiro by Jean François Porchez (Typofonderie)


imageCompanion League by Gumpita Rahayu


imageShelley by DJ Sherman


imageAmsterdam Superstar by David A. Slaager (Fonts of Chaos)


imageAmpleSoft by Aakash Soneri


imageVoltage by Laura Worthington


Lettering:


imageLet It Roll by Jillian Adel


imageTypeLimited 001, part of Joseph Alessio's TypeLimited project


imageThe Brush Letter by Ken Barber


imageJust Have Fun! by Scott Biersack


imageCaptain Josh Hill by Claire Coullon


imageSomeThing unused by JC Deserve


imageHumble Pie Type by Danielle Evans


image 
Will Letter For Lunch by Lauren Hom


imagePractice Makes Perfect by Becca Clason


imageKingdom by David Grimes


imageWonderful Rejects by Melissa Ginsiorsky


imagebuncha hand drawn words by Lauri Johnston


imageSmooth by Jessica Libby


imagefull by Frances MacLeod


image Guilty Pleasures by Anna Ropalo


imageWednesday by Stephanie Schlim


imageSalvage Press printer’s mark by Signal Type Foundry


imageRegular Display weights finished by Neil Summerour


imageHandlettered Logotypes 3 by Mateusz Witczak


Coaches’ Picks


imageChalk Lettering by Valentina Badeanu

Coming soon…
I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myself, Erik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.
readlagom:
Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter. High-res

Coming soon…

I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myselfErik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.

readlagom:

Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

Creative Covers

This Frankenstein, book cover is right up my street and quite inspirational for the work I’m doing at the moment. It’s was design a few years ago by Maciej Ratajki, a designer based in Warsaw, Poland.

For me, everything works well together. The composition with triple use of the ‘n’,  the play of scale with the author’s name and the ‘i’ nested within the large characters, and the blackletter typeface.
My only reservation is the detailed loop on the ‘a’ which is a little distracting when combined with the scale of smaller type. I’d have been tempted to redraw the top of it.

Spotted over on http://typeverything.com/

Bike Badges

Collecting these would be a great hobby for someone interested in both type and bikes.

Self proclaimed ‘bike geek’ Jeffery Conner is certainly into the latter. A professor from Michigan, USA, Jeff’s been collecting bicycle head badges since 2000, starting with just three badges, his collection grew to over 800 in just 36 months. The slightly curved badges come from all over the world and Jeff has found almost every letter of the alphabet (he was just missing Q & X according to this article

“There are symbols of freedom and speed – with wings and birds abounding – and also a debt to heraldic animals (serpents, lions and eagles, in particular), with ideas of strength and precision also conveyed in the designs.”

Last year London design agency, Carter Wong, produced a book collecting some of their favourite badges as a self-initiated project.

Imaging one of these flying in front of your trusty wheels!

Creepy Type 2

This ‘oral alphabet’ must surely be a counterpart to the fleshy type I posted about a few months ago.

The toothy type has been created by Japanese designer Takayuki Ogawa who was inspired by the the mouth’s ability to express such a wide range of emotions by itself. This is clearly demonstrated in the many emoticons that use the mouth to describe the key emotion—  :) :D :p. :/ —etc.

Brilliantly executed, they have been made from stone powder clay, acrylic paint, varnish, wood and iron, though, you might think twice before using them on that wedding invite…

Comic Sans For Cancer

Earlier this week I went along to the opening of the Comic Sans for Cancer exhibition inspired by the 20th anniversary of type designer, Vincent Connare’s clownish typeface.

Around 200 designs from 34 countries were invited to illustrate what the typeface means to them. Posters, featuring the typeface ‘everybody loves to hate’, were are being sold to raise money for Cancer Research UK.

Due to the character of the typeface combined with of the subject matter, the excellent collection of designs lean toward the quirky and amusing. London based, Vincent Connare was at the event and giving it his full support, signing books and copies of the poster that that he’d submitted (featuring his normally placid cat, above).

Comic Sans for Cancer. Until 24th August 2014, The Proud Archivist London

Doorway to type nirvana?
I love this close up of a mural by Colossal Media, in Williamsburg, New York. The sign painters are well-known for their enormous outdoor murals, art projects and advertising images. Always hand-painted and often hundreds of feet off of the ground.
This is photo is from their Big Brush Project, a public art initiative showcasing their work. It was produced in collaboration with NYC-based lettering artist Greg Lamarche and reads Sky High Murals.

“Greg’s technique of hand-cutting found letters was a perfect compliment to the precision-based, hand-paint production method. This piece speaks greatly to the evolution of this community, the art world, and the hand-paint story.”
High-res

Doorway to type nirvana?

I love this close up of a mural by Colossal Media, in Williamsburg, New York. The sign painters are well-known for their enormous outdoor murals, art projects and advertising images. Always hand-painted and often hundreds of feet off of the ground.

This is photo is from their Big Brush Project, a public art initiative showcasing their work. It was produced in collaboration with NYC-based lettering artist Greg Lamarche and reads Sky High Murals.

“Greg’s technique of hand-cutting found letters was a perfect compliment to the precision-based, hand-paint production method. This piece speaks greatly to the evolution of this community, the art world, and the hand-paint story.”