Typography

Showing 390 posts tagged Typography

You are the one

I really like the combined lettering on these Brazilian ads for Feevale University. It’s a shame the final, compiled design is cluttered with extra messaging and branding—which could have been contained within the numeral—but the actual lettering works well with the photography.

typostrate: “You are not another one, you are the one”. Made by Mauricio Thomsen, Art Director from Porto Alegre, Brazil. A perfect example how typography can function within big campaigns and ad commercials. 

wOW! Illuminations
The design of this type specification has hugely inspired me over the last few years. The black and fluorescent decorations on the initials feel embossed with an almost flock texture. I love the positive/negative capitals and look at the way the pattern surrounding the O opens to allow the T close. It manages to look both antique and modern.
Unfortunately this rather blurry photo is all I have. In the past I took a more lackadaisical approach to note taking, and have no record of the specimen’s title. I was shown the book by the previous librarian of St. Brides. On a recent return trip I tried to find the book but with the largest collection of specimens in the world, and a change in librarians, the search was futile. High-res

wOW! Illuminations

The design of this type specification has hugely inspired me over the last few years. The black and fluorescent decorations on the initials feel embossed with an almost flock texture. I love the positive/negative capitals and look at the way the pattern surrounding the O opens to allow the T close. It manages to look both antique and modern.

Unfortunately this rather blurry photo is all I have. In the past I took a more lackadaisical approach to note taking, and have no record of the specimen’s title. I was shown the book by the previous librarian of St. Brides. On a recent return trip I tried to find the book but with the largest collection of specimens in the world, and a change in librarians, the search was futile.

Typo Tomorrow

Typo San francisco starts tomorrow (10-11th April). Numerous names from the type world will be speaking including our own Elliot Jay Stocks. He’ll be joined by; Dan Rhatigan of Monotype, Gemma O’Brien from Sydney and Sibylle Hagmann. The facilitators include Erik Spiekermann, and Stephen Coles.

This year’s theme, “Rhythm,” explores the cadence of the creative process, the underlying tempo of inspiration, and the beats of the design experience. - See more.

Here Be Monsters

I noticed this wonderful Icelandic project of illustrated type inspired by medieval maps featuring fantastical sea creatures. 

Design by Reykjavík based Stella Björg, these decorated capitals remind me of the Victorian illustrations I’ve written about recently. I love that several of the creatures appear to be based on specific Icelandic mythical beasts, as named at the bottom of the print. I also really like the print colours and flecked paper that gives the final work its antique look.

My “Here Be Monsters” illustrated letters started from the simple idea of writing “MONSTER” but having finished it just didn’t seem like there was much left to complete the alphabet. I was in no hurry to complete it, so very slowly monstrous letters got added and finally there appeared a complete alphabet. - Stella Björg

Daft Type

These Daft Punk merchandise ads do a great job of mimicking ads from the ’70s. The layouts, colours and type all evoke the decades’ graphic style.

Above, you can see one of their latest ads alongside a Coke ad from 1970. (The very same ad that Michael Bierut describes in the Helvetica film: “It’s the real thing. Period! Coke. Period! In Helvetica. Period! Any questions? Of course not. Drink Coke. Period! Simple.”)

The typeface chosen for the 2014 ad appears to be Kabel Black or Geometric 231 Heavy and while it’s no Helvetica, I think it does a much better job in this instance.

3D Printable Type

I know there are designers working on typefaces that are optimised for 3D printing but this alphabet, by Loren Kulesus of Brooklyn, is something else entirely.

“The design uses 1mm wall thicknesses which seem to print very nicely on all 3d printers, and the simple and iterative appearance mimics heat sinks.”

Look at that ‘o’ made by joining two blocks! Very imaginative.

Type Anatomy
I think this print was produced a couple of years ago but I saw again the other day and thought it might be useful to post here.
The attractive Alphabet of Type is more of a type anatomy infographic. Each letter models a specific typographic structure together with the correct nomenclature; ears, loops, links, tittles, hooks, spines, tails, ligatures, and more. Produced by Patrick Mulligan and Ben Gibson. High-res

Type Anatomy

I think this print was produced a couple of years ago but I saw again the other day and thought it might be useful to post here.

The attractive Alphabet of Type is more of a type anatomy infographic. Each letter models a specific typographic structure together with the correct nomenclature; ears, loops, links, tittles, hooks, spines, tails, ligatures, and more. Produced by Patrick Mulligan and Ben Gibson.

Time Stamped

To achieve a perfectly packaged book, Finnish authors, Christoffer & Kaisa Leka, wanted to take their presentation to a new level by having the stamps designed as well.

Thier latest book, Time After Time comes enveloped in its own wrapping paper, custom printed to match the book’s colorful end papers and is meticulously wrapped and lettered by Christoffer himself.

The beautiful set of characters above have been designed by a host of typographers from all over the world, many well-known in the industry: Erik van Blokland, Maria Doreuli, Dave Foster, Kimya Gandhi, Cyrus Highsmith, Robert Keller, Ben Kiel, Indra Kupferschmidt, David Ross, Nick Sherman, Florian Schick, Nina Stöessinger, Lauri Toikka, Wout Trippas, Teo Tuominen & Bernd Volmer.

I love this obsession to perfect every last detail; Ensuring that the book, which has obviously been lovingly crafted, is placed in the hands of the reader so carefully.

Each letters has been reproduced with gouache paint by designer Markku Mujunen on 6 millimeter thick plywood and each piece measures approximately 180 x 180 millimeters. To cover the costs, the originals paintings are being sold for €50. First come first served.

Make a note: Work Hard and Be Nice to People

I saw these colourful notebooks were released yesterday. Printed in with Anthony Burrill’s now famous slogans, in collaboration with Rubberband.

In a recent conversation with Anthony we discussed the differences between his work and the clichéd derivative ‘quote posters’ that you see so many of—though not on this blog [Keep Calm and Don’t Design One].

His original Work Hard and Be Nice to People poster (see the bottom image) developed from an overheard statement from an elderly lady in a supermarket, passing on some wisdom she’d learnt in her life.
Quite taken with the words, he then composed the statement with visual reference to the powerful civil rights poster, I am a man (1968), and the subsequent War is over John Lennon poster (1971).
By using whatever large wooden type was available at the printers, Anthony’s design consciously achieves the same sense of typographical freedom and naïvety that the reference posters have. 

Now Anthony’s poster has in turn been mimicked many times but it’s unlikely to have been done with the same creativity or reverence to the original inspiration. 

No, they certainly don’t

I’m not sure how I missed this project from Anthony Burrill a few years ago. Many of his well know works have been letterpressed but this is genius:

A screen-printed poster made with oil from the 2010 Gulf of Mexico disaster.

Proceeds from the sale of the print were donated to CRCL (Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana) a non-profit organisation dedicated to restoring the Gulf of Mexico’s coastal wetlands. The project was conceived and produced in collaboration with Happiness Brussels (2010)