letterpress

Showing 46 posts tagged letterpress

Coming soon…
I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myself, Erik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.
readlagom:
Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter. High-res

Coming soon…

I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myselfErik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.

readlagom:

Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

It’s surprising and a little exciting when you flick through Tumblr and see something you’ve designed. This recent musical  ‘G’ was inspired by the Pouchée types. It needs a little more work and is part of a bigger design which I’m hoping to finish and then letterpress later this month. More to follow.

visualvibs:

Musical ‘G’ by Jamie Clarke
Twitter: @visualvibs High-res

It’s surprising and a little exciting when you flick through Tumblr and see something you’ve designed. This recent musical ‘G’ was inspired by the Pouchée types. It needs a little more work and is part of a bigger design which I’m hoping to finish and then letterpress later this month. More to follow.

visualvibs:

Musical ‘G’ by Jamie Clarke

Twitter: @visualvibs

(via goodtypography)

Vivid Red Ampersands

I printed these bright red ampersands for friends and family a while ago from woodblocks dating back over 100 years. I really liked the four different styles; a very musical character (which formed the basis for a family wedding invite that I helped create), a super fat face version, a smaller almost ’70s shape and a narrow western-style ampersand.

The blocks were found at the St. Bride typographic library in London, where I printed them using a Vandercook onto thick, textured, off-white stock.

Due to the woodblocks natural ageing and past use there are little marks and dings which I didn’t try to cover up—it just adds to the charm.

There are a few unframed ones available to buy on the Type Worship Shop. I thoguht they may make a nice, alternative, valentine’s gift

Typographic Time Capsule: Exmouth Market Print

The final letterpress version of my print is now available, capturing the colourful history and present-day character of Exmouth Market. This vibrant little street is one of Central London’s hidden gems, packed with independent shops, restaurants, cafés and market stalls.

Researched over several months, this snapshot aims to preserve the street’s unique identity, recording each of the street’s current ‘establishments of note’ and regular market stalls. It also delves into its shady 400-year history, that includes blood sports, a disreputable Victorian tea garden and an atrocious graveyard now buried under the adjacent park.

The decorated initials, spelling ‘Exmouth’, have been inspired by the rich assortment of lettering found on the street or designed to represent its past. (you can read more about them here) The text is also full of little typographic details, such as historical and ornamental characters, which were great fun to add.

  • Letterpress in silver, turquoise and black
  • Individually signed, limited edition of 250
  • Printed on Crane’s Lettra 300gsm paper
  • Size: 660 x 464 mm (25.9” x 18.2”) allowing the body text to be easily read from a couple of feet away
  • Set in Minion Pro (Robert Slimbach, 1990) and printed by Hand & Eye letterpress, London

Establishments Noted:
North side: Caravan, Gulshan Tandoori, The Exmouth Arms, Space EC1, Brill, Farringdon Locksmith & Tool Shop, G N Furniture, Gail’s Bakery, EC One, Café Kick, Bagman and Robin, Family Tree, Potato Merchant & Santoré.
South side: Paesan, East Central Cycles, The Church of Our Most Holy Redeemer, Big Wheel Theatre Company, The Klinik, Clerkenwell Tales, Morito, Moro, Medcalf, Clark’s Pie & Mash, EXM Hair & Beauty, Pride of Siam, Nécco, McCaul Goldsmiths, Family Business, Hummus Bros, Sweet Boulangerie & Patisserie & Book Ends.

Buy one of these limited edition prints here:

Alphabet and Image Magazine

A few hastily taken snaps of this 1940s publication shown at the St. Brides ‘Type Tuesday’ event this week. They were picked from Reading University’s type and print archive by eye magazine’s Art Director, Simon Esterson, to show on the night.

Apart from the frayed, yellowed paper (which simply adds to their beauty) they could have been designed yesterday. I love them.

There are more photos of this post-war typography and visual arts publication over on Mike Dempsey’s Graphic Journey.

For the Love of Letterpress

The Counter Press describes itself as “a little letterpress studio producing small scale, limited edition typographic prints and printed matter.” Behind this modest description however, you’ll find an extremely passionate pair of designers who have built an impressive, analogue only, print studio with a growing portfolio of typographic work, in a little over two years—all in their spare time.

I visited the studio this weekend to meet with David Marshall and Elizabeth Ellis. The duo design and print around their busy freelance schedules working for prestigious branding agencies. Founded in 2011 to fulfil a creative yearning, David said that the Counter Press was “a hobby that got totally out of control”. “We started for the love of it. At first we were curious to see how others were doing it. The letterpress world is like a bubble—a real niche. Now we’re part of that world, and have become petty well known. It’s much harder to achieve this in other areas of design where the communities are much larger and fragmented”

Based in a bright former warehouse, run by Bow Arts Trust, the ground floor room is a perfect size to contain the impressive set-up. Plan chests and type drawers run along the walls, either side of a solid composing table with the presses at one end: A pair of tabletop Platens, an A3 size proofing press and a large Vandercook Cylinder press.

They are committed to practicing traditional methods, only printing with the wood and metal type they have acquired—no plates or computers. Despite this, the work they produce is very modern in both composition and content. With only evenings, weekends and the occasional holidays, they have to be certain that their time is focussed on the work that suits them. “It takes so long, the ideas we print need to be worth it, so a lot of thought goes into our prints. Letterpress is slow, complicated and often painful, but because this is spaced over weekends and evenings, the ideas are allowed to percolate and little details are added along the way.”

With this in mind, they’ve enjoyed developing processes to suit their way of working. To avoid opening cans of ink and the lengthy clean-up, early stages of their work are printed “dry”, using carbon paper to take an impression of small sections. In this way the larger design can be composed from these ‘printed’ slips in the way pre-computer layouts were made.

David and Elizabeth make it quite clear that they are not interested in making a living as commercial letterpress printers. “The whole point was to have the creative freedom to indulge ourselves and print what we liked. We’re interested in developing ways to keep doing what we’re doing while slowly expanding. As designers first and printers second, we get excited about problem solving and finding solutions using letterpress, so we would like to explore ways of collaborating with more designers on projects.”

So far they’ve made good traction selling their prints. It’s inspirational to see such creative energy, and investment put into self-fulfilling work. The Counter Press is a great example how much can be accomplished in your spare time and what passion can achieve.

Typographic time capsule

Here is a sneak-peek of a typographic print I’ve been working on. It’s a snapshot of Exmouth Market, a vibrant commercial street, full of independent shops, restaurants and cafés, close to me in Central London. The aim is to capture its colourful history and present day character for posterity.

Historical research was conducted over a couple of months, to uncover the location’s 400-year-old story that includes; vineyards, duck hunting, a Victorian tea garden and an atrocious graveyard now buried under the adjacent park. The print also lists over 40 of the street’s venues, in an ‘establishments of note’ section, that includes the weekly market stalls that set-up along the street.

To evoke the feel of the market, each of the illuminated capitals, spelling ‘Exmouth’, has been inspired by the rich assortment of lettering found on the street, or its story. The typography has been arranged to create a formal structure that includes the use of ornaments, pilcrows and other interesting characters.

A limited edition is being letterpressed next week in silver, turquoise and black on 300gsm Crane’s Lettra paper. I’m looking forward to seeing how it turns out.

Typographic Brooklyn Bridge

Cameron Moll is reimagining the Brooklyn Bridge designed entirely with type. The project which has taken three years is his third print produced in this way. Constructed from the letters of typefaces designed during the same period as the bridges’ construction, Cameron chose Antique Triple Extra Condensed and German blackletter, Fetta Gotish in honour of Architect John Roebling’s German heritage.

There are some lovely details, hidden in the brickwork of lettering are John Roebling’s name, that of his son, Washington, who took over as chief engineer, and the sir names of those who died during its construction.

Cameron’s raising money on Kickstarter to have the print letterpressed in two colours (picked with a Pantone swatch held to the bridge). So far he’s raised five times the target.

The final artwork will be 24”×16”, printed on Crane Lettra Pearl. Limited edition (1,500 copies).

A post by Brad Martin at londondesignz. I Love that ‘S’!

The Society of Revisionist Typographers at Fortnum & Mason.

As part of the London Design Festival, The Society of Revisionist Typographers (known also as SORT Design) were running a Letterpress workshop at Fortnum & Mason in London’s Piccadilly. I popped in to see them and the lovely examples of their work being showcased.

Driven by a passion for traditional printing skills, Thomas Boulton and Theo Wang founded SORT with the aim of bringing these skills back into active use through application and practice. While this philosophy underpins their work, they don’t let it limit their creativity. The examples above demonstrate a maturity, depth of knowledge and firm grounding in typographic practice.

For anyone visiting them at Fortum & Mason, SORT were giving out personalised note pads, the catch being that you had to print your own! Once they had composited and inserted the type, the lucky recipient had to operate the Letterpress - one swing of the lever and my notepad was ready. No prizes for guessing what I had printed, but I’ve included a couple of photos above if it wasn’t obvious!

Talking type with Phil Baines

I had the pleasure of meeting Phil Baines today for an 8 Faces interview. I’ve been a long time admirer of his work since I saw his beautiful, typographic paschal candles featured in Typography Now: the Next Wave in 1991.

We met at the stunning Central Saint Martins building in the heart of London’s Kings Cross redevelopment area, and settled in to the typographic archive room for a chat. We went through some of Phil’s recent work and spoke about his experience and views on design and typography.

The final 8 Faces poster: Designed & printed by Erik Spiekermann

For the final poster in our series of limited edition artwork prints, we’ve done something truly special: number eight has been designed and hand-printed by Erik Spiekermann on his Korrex proof press in Berlin, using original wood and metal type. Above, you can also see some shots that Erik took of the printing process.

As with our previous prints, each copy is individually numbered and bears the 8 Faces blind-embossed stamp, but additionally each print has also been hand-signed by Erik!

Due to the high number of customers who pre-ordered all eight pieces of art, have less than 50 to sell, so be very quick!

All orders will ship in the last week of July, packed in protective cardboard tubes.