letters

Showing 39 posts tagged letters

Creepy Type 2

This ‘oral alphabet’ must surely be a counterpart to the fleshy type I posted about a few months ago.

The toothy type has been created by Japanese designer Takayuki Ogawa who was inspired by the the mouth’s ability to express such a wide range of emotions by itself. This is clearly demonstrated in the many emoticons that use the mouth to describe the key emotion—  :) :D :p. :/ —etc.

Brilliantly executed, they have been made from stone powder clay, acrylic paint, varnish, wood and iron, though, you might think twice before using them on that wedding invite…

For your favourite typography books

I discovered a few wood type projects by Matt Innes of Melbourne, Australia. These bookshelf letters, made with a CNC router out of Jarrah-faced birch plywood, are a personal project. They look gorgeous. Each letter has been sized to fit just “those books you go back to time & again”. 

Made in collaboration with Saori Kajiwara600 x 250 x 190mm per character. 

Letters from Porto
These vibrant montages have been created by Andrew Howard, Graphic Designer and course leader of the MA in Communication Design at ESAD, Portugal

Andrew introduced the study of typography to the curriculum at ESAD and challenged his students to walk the streets and record the typography and lettering from the world around them. This successful and valuable research exercise has now spread to other design facilities.

These prints, the result of Andrew’s own visual research and photography and show how beautiful this record of lettering can be when curated thoughtfully. There are some fantastic examples in this collection gathered together over a decade.

maybeitsgreat:

Letters from Porto by Andrew Howard, 2013, Portugal

The changing face of Bowie
I just spotted this typographic screen print produced exclusively for London’s V&A museum to coincide with it’s forthcoming David Bowie exhibition. 
It features the lettering and bespoke typefaces from over 100 designers. Matt white ink has been printed over rainbow holographic paper which looks brilliant. Each print comes with a certificate naming the full list of contributors including, Jonathan Barnbrook, Ian Anderson and Anthony Burrill.
I love the look of it but I think the overall effect is a little crowded and too much like a list of type specimens. I’d have preferred it to be bigger too. The print is 50x50cm. High-res

The changing face of Bowie

I just spotted this typographic screen print produced exclusively for London’s V&A museum to coincide with it’s forthcoming David Bowie exhibition. 

It features the lettering and bespoke typefaces from over 100 designers. Matt white ink has been printed over rainbow holographic paper which looks brilliant. Each print comes with a certificate naming the full list of contributors including, Jonathan Barnbrook, Ian Anderson and Anthony Burrill.

I love the look of it but I think the overall effect is a little crowded and too much like a list of type specimens. I’d have preferred it to be bigger too. The print is 50x50cm.

Modern Wood Type

In a process moving from digital to manual, these beautiful woodblocks have been designed in Illustrator, laser cut and then printed by hand.

Produced by Nigel Bents, Paul Oakley and Jonny Holmes while at Chelsea College of Art & Design in London, the characters were based on a Bodoni poster typeface. The extreme stroke contrast has been used to house these playful decorative patterns.

The letters were cut from 3mm plywood then mounted on type-high blocks before letterpress printing at New North Press in Hoxton.

Even before inking, I love how the laser cutting has scorched a warm colour onto the wooden face of the letters.

'Lumen Type'

These beautifully ethereal letters have been created with water droplets and light.

Inspired by the reflections of car headlights on a road spattered with rain drops they are the experiments of Russian designer Ruslan Khasanov.  

Each letter was has been created from water droplets produced with a syringe that are then illuminated from different angles and viewed through a lens. 

God’s own junkyard - The Neon Man

These photos feel wonderfully festive.
After making neon signs for 37 years, Chris Bracey has truly earned his nickname, The Neon Man. He learnt the process from his father, who used to make signs for amusement arcades, fairgrounds and circuses.

Working as a neon light artist, Chris’s work is very desirable and his reputation has been amplified by high-profile collectors and blockbuster films featuring his signs (among the movie list you can spot several fictional cities including Superman’s metropolis, Tim Burton’s Batman’s Gotham City, and Judge Dredd’s Mega-City).

These shots have been taken at his warehouse in East London, dubbed “God’s Own Junkyard”, where Chris has collected up to 1,000 neon signs, including many of his own works and film props.

Vibrant typographic prints by Boldover

I’d posted one of Dan Chamberlain’s prints over a year ago and took another look recently to see what was new. There’s now a huge collection of abstract typographic prints, like these, with some great colour work.

Dan runs an independent graphic design studio, Boldover, based in Devon in the UK’s South West and is adding designs all the time. Take a look at the thumbnails on Flickr.

Architectural Type Experiments

These three posters were created by California based, Katie Tonkovich, for a hypothetical lecture series discussing different architectural periods of ancient fortresses and castles.

The type is constructed by hand using the materials showcased in the lecture series. I like the wooden/bamboo looking framework, it creates a slightly precarious shape for the letters. Not sure how the silk is used for a fortress. Nomadic tents maybe? Nicely shot and designed.