type

Showing 456 posts tagged type

Alphabet post by Dribbble

Today Dribbble got in touch with me to say that they had posted one of my shots along with a number of other Type and Lettering examples. They’ve collected together this beautifully presented sample of designs below, I feel lucky to be included.
Type:
imageAnders by Tom Anders

imageRidewell by Kostas Bartsokas


imageGood News Sans by Kyle Wayne Benson


image In-progress typeface by Jamie Clarke (That’s me!)


imageUni Sans by Fontfabric


imageNITRO by Hoefler & Co.


imageBrix Sans by Hannes von Döhren & Livius F. Dietzel/HVD Fonts


imageArkiv by Timo Kuilder


imageMulti Headline Black Italic by Laura Meseguer


imageRetiro by Jean François Porchez (Typofonderie)


imageCompanion League by Gumpita Rahayu


imageShelley by DJ Sherman


imageAmsterdam Superstar by David A. Slaager (Fonts of Chaos)


imageAmpleSoft by Aakash Soneri


imageVoltage by Laura Worthington


Lettering:


imageLet It Roll by Jillian Adel


imageTypeLimited 001, part of Joseph Alessio's TypeLimited project


imageThe Brush Letter by Ken Barber


imageJust Have Fun! by Scott Biersack


imageCaptain Josh Hill by Claire Coullon


imageSomeThing unused by JC Deserve


imageHumble Pie Type by Danielle Evans


image 
Will Letter For Lunch by Lauren Hom


imagePractice Makes Perfect by Becca Clason


imageKingdom by David Grimes


imageWonderful Rejects by Melissa Ginsiorsky


imagebuncha hand drawn words by Lauri Johnston


imageSmooth by Jessica Libby


imagefull by Frances MacLeod


image Guilty Pleasures by Anna Ropalo


imageWednesday by Stephanie Schlim


imageSalvage Press printer’s mark by Signal Type Foundry


imageRegular Display weights finished by Neil Summerour


imageHandlettered Logotypes 3 by Mateusz Witczak


Coaches’ Picks


imageChalk Lettering by Valentina Badeanu

Coming soon…
I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myself, Erik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.
readlagom:
Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter. High-res

Coming soon…

I’m looking forward to my copy of Lagom magazine #1.  Pretty much the whole team from 8 Faces magazine has been involved, including myselfErik and of course Sam and Elliot Jay Stocks as editors.

readlagom:

Erik Spiekermann might have recently retired from running Edenspiekermann and FontShop, but his version of retirement is somewhat different to most sixty-seven year-olds: he’s decided to go back to his roots and has founded the letterpress workshop P98a in Berlin. In our debut issue, which will be available to buy on Wednesday 24th September, Erik shared some thoughts about his new venture. Here’s an excerpt:

Thirty years ago, the message and the medium were identical. You set letters into words by touching them. The body of a metal letter is an object that compositors can read, from left to right, albeit upside-down. In order to read it comfortably, however, the surface of that object is covered in ink and pressed against paper. That’s what we call printing. We still print today, although the process of converting data into little blobs of ink is all but invisible. The marks on paper show up as ‘printed’ letters and are perfectly readable, but there is no indication of what happened inside that printer. The substrate itself is not supposed to be noticed; it is just a receptacle for the message.

And why did return to printing now?

First and foremost this is an attempt to go back to where type and typography come from: an ingenious system of pre-fabricated elements that we assemble into words and pages.

Wise words, indeed. You can read the full piece in Lagom #1 (the photo above is our proof copy), and to get notified about the issue’s release, sign up to our newsletter.

Creative Covers

This Frankenstein, book cover is right up my street and quite inspirational for the work I’m doing at the moment. It’s was design a few years ago by Maciej Ratajki, a designer based in Warsaw, Poland.

For me, everything works well together. The composition with triple use of the ‘n’,  the play of scale with the author’s name and the ‘i’ nested within the large characters, and the blackletter typeface.
My only reservation is the detailed loop on the ‘a’ which is a little distracting when combined with the scale of smaller type. I’d have been tempted to redraw the top of it.

Spotted over on http://typeverything.com/

London Loop
I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)
The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.
What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.
High-res

London Loop

I spotted this fun motion graphic over on Herbert Frost’s blog, who translated the German calligraphy notes that I posted yesterday (thanks again Herbert!)

The above animation, by Al Boardman, is part of a longer 100 second film called ‘8 Great things to do in London’. The British designer’s blog is full of cool little animations, some for fun, some part of wider projects.

What is equally impressive is his achievements as a rock climber and mountaineer:

Al has summitted several previously unclimbed mountains. One of which is in Central Asia and, in an interview with the BBC, revealed that he was naming the peak after his grandmother. The rest of Al’s family are still waiting for him to make more first ascents and to name the peaks after them, which is awkward.

(via herbertfrost)

Psst…calligraphy class notes

To prepare for a move from London to Sydney, I’m going through my plan chest and book shelves, full typographic and lettering ephemera, and decide what stays and what comes with me (mostly with me it seems!). So you might an eclectic mix of photos over the coming days.

For those of you that were interested in Seb Lester’s recent guest post on calligraphy, I thought these might be useful. I was given these worksheets during the Calligraphy workshop with Andreas Frohloff, during Type London (Places 2011). I posted a couple of photos at the time of his class and wonderful antique pen collection, here & here.

The sheet is quite handy for referring to how the shapes of latin letters are constructed. They are of course in German, so if anyone fancies translating in the comments, go for it!

It’s surprising and a little exciting when you flick through Tumblr and see something you’ve designed. This recent musical  ‘G’ was inspired by the Pouchée types. It needs a little more work and is part of a bigger design which I’m hoping to finish and then letterpress later this month. More to follow.

visualvibs:

Musical ‘G’ by Jamie Clarke
Twitter: @visualvibs High-res

It’s surprising and a little exciting when you flick through Tumblr and see something you’ve designed. This recent musical ‘G’ was inspired by the Pouchée types. It needs a little more work and is part of a bigger design which I’m hoping to finish and then letterpress later this month. More to follow.

visualvibs:

Musical ‘G’ by Jamie Clarke

Twitter: @visualvibs

(via goodtypography)

A for Art

A logo for the Philadelphia Museum of Art has has been designed by Pentagram’s Paula Scher.

Aiming to put ‘art’ front and centre, it features a flexible initial A that can customised to show off the museum’s collection of 227,000 items. The Museum’s typeface Avenir is customized for the new configuration.

The identity overhaul coincides with the unveiling of plans for a renewal and expansion of the Museum by architect Frank Gehry.

Embrace the wobble

In this, the second of our guest posts, Ged Palmer, designer, letterer and burgeoning sign painter, reminds us of how wide the pool of inspirational lettering is… 

Good typography is all about clean lines, smooth curves and harmony, right? Well, for the most part I subscribe to that philosophy whole-heartedly. I mean you only have to see Herman Zapf drawing curves to agree with that! Then again, these days I find myself more and more attracted to the weird and wonderful world of vernacular typography and lettering. I’m talking about the type of design that’s not made by designers: wonky signs, yard sale posters, janky tags and sketchy handwriting. Things that are made by hand are imperfect and that human quality is what gives it life, as Margaret Kilgallen once eloquently put.

So whilst we strive to make our work as beautiful and well polished as we can, let’s take a moment to embrace the wobbles, the drips, the busted-up, the forgotten and the downtrodden. 

via londondesignz:

More from No Straight Lines.

Following my recent post showcasing the ‘No Straight Lines’ exhibit that formed part of the Alchemy Festival, here’s a few more examples that were on display. This time the glyphs derive from the Roman character set, but the forms are more delicate and exhibit organic elements. Quite a contrast to the Geometric San Serif qualities of the letters based on a hybrid of the Sinhala and Tamil writing systems.

There’s more detail on the work in general at dropr.com/aodgraphicdesign, while a summary of No Straight Lines can be found on the South Bank Centre’s website.